5 Ways to Improve Loose-leash Walking!

Dogs generally pull on the leash because they walk faster than we do. We need to gently teach them to slow down when on leash. Here are some tips on teaching dogs to walk nicely on the leash:

  1. If the dog is being walked to the person’s left, place the leash handle around the handler’s right wrist and use the left hand to hold the leash at its midpoint. There should be a “J” shape from the dog’s collar in the leash.
  2. Begin walking the dog and when the dog looks up at the person, reward this with a treat from the left hand or hand closest to the dog (this prevents teaching the dog to cross in front of the person).
  3. If the dog starts to forge ahead, get the pup’s attention by patting your own hip or thigh to get the pup’s attention and gently changing directions (reward when the pup is in the correct place and leash is loose). If there isn’t room to change direction and the dog is pulling, simply stop and wait for the dog to return to the handler and then proceed and reward while the dog is walking on a loose leash next to you. The dog will soon understand that the walk only continues when the leash is slack.
  4. Often pups will grab the leash in their mouth. To redirect this I take toys or a tug toy with me to let them carry or I tie a toy to their collar for them to grab and hold instead of the leash.
  5. Use a humane no-pull harness (with a d-ring on the front) to walk the dog in when you are not actively training your dog). I like the Tellington Touch harness and the Freedom harness.

And here are a couple of “don’ts”:

  1. Don’t allow the dog to pull toward the other dog and then have a greet and play. This is a huge reward for pulling so don’t allow the pup to get into this habit- I put greetings on cue so the dog is clear.
  2. Avoid using a flexi-leash. These leashes actively reinforce pulling by rewarding the dog with more leash when they pull!

Travelling safely with your dog

Regularly I see dogs being transported loose in vehicles or in the backs of pick up trucks. Not only is this dangerous for dogs and drivers, but it is also against the law in our province.

Always use either a seatbelt harness or a secure crate when travelling with a dog. This keeps everyone safe from being distracted while driving and secures your pet in the event of an accident.

Inside your vehicle unrestrained or uncontained dogs are a hazard to themselves and to others. According to the BCSPCA website, a 50-pound pet, when traveling at speeds of 50 km/h, has the weight of approximately one ton.

In the event of a sudden stop, the dog can be seriously injured or seriously injure someone.

Train your dog to remain in the vehicle until given the cue word to exit (even once their seatbelt harness is undone). If you use a crate, attach an information sheet about your pet (address, vet information, contact for friend or family. List care information for your dog too like vaccinations, food also).

Don’t ever transport your dog in the bed of a truck without using a secured crate. I prefer the hard sided airline crates. In BC, Section 72 of the Motor Vehicle Act prohibits the transport of an unsecured pet in the back of a pick-up truck. Even restrained in the back of a truck with a leash, dogs can be hanged. They are also exposed to the elements risking hypothermia, heatstroke, eye and ear injury and they have no protection in case of an accident.

If you are injured, emergency personnel may be prevented from assisting you in a timely manner if the loose dog is now guarding you and your vehicle. A frightened dog may bolt from the scene.

Stay safe!