Pet Dog Manners

Level one: 

This is for beginner dogs of any age. Owners are taught how to teach their dogs to walk nicely on leash (loose leash walking); to sit, down and stand on cue; to come when called and to leave items alone when asked (leave it). Owners will learn when to reward and how to recognize different signals dogs use to communicate with us and with one another. Participants will need a six foot fixed length leash, a comfortable harness or flat collar for the dog and high value treats.

Courses are 6 weeks long, 45 minute weekly classes , limited to 6 dogs and handlers per class. $154.35 including GST.

Next PDM level 1 outdoor course is being held in Roberts Creek and starts Tuesday February 6 at 9 am   Register

Tracking training!

Tracking is a fun activity many dogs can do and that most enjoy. Generally if a dog enjoys retrieving, has some prey drive, shows persistence in finding things and is in good health, they will do well in tracking. Success in tracking is also dependent on the skill of the trainer, the time spent teaching the dog the basics and beyond and the rewards for the dog.

Tracking and search work utilizes the incredible senses that dogs possess. In particular, their sense of smell. When trained, dogs can identify and follow the scent of a particular person or animal, indicate to their handler when they have identified a certain odour like that of illicit drugs or the presence of bedbugs for example.

The human body reportedly sheds about 30,00 to 40,000 skin cells per minute (varies due to several factors) and these cells become a part of individualized “rafts” made up of one or more cells and about 4 microbial “passengers”DSC_0013 of bacteria unique to the person. This is what tracking dogs follow when tracking an individual.

By keeping the track simple initially, the dog’s confidence in both himself and the handler will grow. Over time and as the dog’s skills increase, the tracks can be made steadily more difficult in a variety of ways, always working at a pace where the dog’s confidence is built and maintained. There are many things that can influence the difficulty of the track, such as surface of the ground, direction of the track, weather conditions, wind speed and direction, terrain, wildlife that may have left “cross-tracks”, human traffic, buildings, fencing and the speed of the tracklayer’s movement.  The key is to challenge but not overwhelm the dog so he enjoys learning and so he enjoys the search.

Dogs learn quickly when trained using “inducive” techniques, (appealing to his senses, instincts and temperament to provide the dog with a reason to behave in a specific manner), and then rewarding him for the behaviour.

Tracking is a good way to mentally tire a busy dog and dogs of any size and a variety of breeds enjoy fun tracking and search exercises.

How to make a “snuffle mat” for your dog !

Snuffle mats are a great indoor activity for dogs (and cats!). They are easy to make and you can easily create one for your dog!

Here is how:

Purchase an outdoor rubber mat with holes in it (easily available at Canadian Tire ).

Purchase several meters of fleece (it’s surprising how much fleece is needed).

Cut the fleece into strips about 2 centimeters wide by 25 centimeters long.

Working from the underside of the mat, thread a piece of fleece through one of the holes and the other end through the hole next to it. On the topside of the mat, tie a knot between the two ends of the fleece. To make a thicker pile, repeat in another direction to make an “X” on the underside and knot those also. Repeat with the fleece pieces until every hole is filled and you have created a pile on the top of the mat.

 

20151031_123310.jpgYou can also make three different lengths of pile to vary things for your dog.

Once complete, spread treats across the top and, as the dog gets the hang of the game, make it more difficult by hiding treats amongst the fleece pile.